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Cherry Spring State Park (Dark Sky Park)
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  • IB Banned
    1

    So I've never really seen the Milky Way galaxy in person aside from photos. Light pollution is strong in these parts, I'm sure a bunch of you get to see it every night - lucky you. But even then you have more light pollution there than places like this:

    http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/findapark/cherrysprings/

    I've been planning on going here for like 5 years now... finally getting around to going with some friends. Can't wait, stoked. Anyone else familiar with Dark Sky Zone/Parks?

    Pic from actual location at night:
    http://sites.psu.edu/albuck/wp-content/uploads/sites/29996/2016/03/cherry-springs-2.jpg

    The Hound.
    @Naraku4656 said:
    > IB's last thread was by Viperslayer


  • Banned
    -1

    That looks awesome.

    I live in the northeast and the overall light pollution from boston to washington dc is quite pervasive but there are areas up in vermont and the adirondacks that are dark enough to see the milky way.


  • -1

    It looks all right, but I've seen better photos in astronomy textbooks.


  • IB Banned
    0

    The light pollution in places like this is slight enough to actual see man made and natural satellites. I'm f**king pumped I can't wait.
    Gonna take some shots, smoke some buds and enjoy the f**k out of my week there.

    Yea It's highways man. If you live around them you're fked.

    The Hound.
    @Naraku4656 said:
    > IB's last thread was by Viperslayer


  • IB Banned
    0

    Oh yea and the red tint you're seeing on the ground is from film placed over all light fixtures. you have to, it's like a courtesy requirement for being there. stops the light from bleeding out and polluting the sky. I got some for my phone that i'm gonna use while im there.

    The Hound.
    @Naraku4656 said:
    > IB's last thread was by Viperslayer


  • -1

    Take it easy on the curse words. I don't think Pennsylvania has legalized marijuana yet, but I don't keep up with state laws whatsoever, so I could be wrong.


  • Banned
    1

    Damn, I've been trying to go somewhere to see the Milky Way and wanted to do it in Big Bend SP here in Texas.

    Didn't know you could get a good star viewing sky in PA. Here's a light pollution map.

    POOP


  • IB Banned
    0

    yup yup i love that map
    thats how i found out about cherry spring state park

    can't fking wait to go

    i heard texas is just pretty good on light pollution overall.

    The Hound.
    @Naraku4656 said:
    > IB's last thread was by Viperslayer


  • Banned
    0

    When i was a kid i used to be able to spot satellites in the night sky. Today technically we're supposed to see the ISS from central park because it's so large but i can barely make it out. My family used to go upstate in the summer to lake george or lake placid and it was here that the milky way became visible for me. Later on i used to go snowboarding in vermont and the night sky up in those mountains was spectacular. With no leaves on the trees it was like the night sky was 30% larger.


  • Banned
    1

    STFU Zeni.

    POOP


  • IB Banned
    0

    HA! I always catch the ISS at random moments at night in Philly. Philly isn't as bad as NYC tho lol.

    The Hound.
    @Naraku4656 said:
    > IB's last thread was by Viperslayer


  • Banned
    1

    Cities suck, but drive a couple of hours out in any direction away from them and you get good skies.

    POOP


  • IB Banned
    0

    Yea this park is literally in the middle of f**king no where PA.

    The Hound.
    @Naraku4656 said:
    > IB's last thread was by Viperslayer


  • Banned
    -1

    It's not too bad, mostly what cuts out seeing the iss is the haze but on moonless nights in the winter i can see orion pretty clearly and most of the planets at all times.


  • Banned
    -1

    FieryDoom said:

    Cities suck, but drive a couple of hours out in any direction away from them and you get good skies.

    From here a good 4 hours.


  • IB Banned
    0

    it's only in the sky for like 2 minutes right, if that?

    Cus i see this white blip move across the sky fast as shit sometimes at night and it vanishes in an odd way, it like dims out.

    The Hound.
    @Naraku4656 said:
    > IB's last thread was by Viperslayer


  • Banned
    -1

    It can be seen in the early evenings and just before dawn because it's getting sunlight at that altitude, the solar arrays being so reflective make it bright as hell. Plus it's the length of a football field. There are apps that plot out prime viewing times and compass out the direction you should be looking.


  • Banned
    -1

    Viperslayer said:

    it's only in the sky for like 2 minutes right, if that?

    Cus i see this white blip move across the sky fast as shit sometimes at night and it vanishes in an odd way, it like dims out.

    It does fade out, as it crosses into darkness the light is filtered by the atmosphere giving it a reddish hue just before going completely dark.

    Here's a time lapse video of an orbit, you can see its still illuminated by the sun as it passes over areas on the earth that are still dark, this is how we're able to see it.
    https://youtu.be/YQD320c_q7Q


  • Helper
    0

    I think if I actually had a bucket list, something like that would be on it. I think the most night sky I've seen was on a trip in the Judean desert. Stars galore but I don't recall the Milky Way. Had no decent camera with me.

    What the hell is that behind you


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