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Have an interview at Kroger today possibility, or tomorrow open interviews.
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    I know people there too and submitted my application to three local stores near me. From what my friends said, because they are opening a new store close by they have about 100 positions to fill between all their stores. Also said not that many people had applied yet.

    So they are going to put in word with the managers to look for my application. I probably have 99% chance to get a job there by tomorrow, even if they don't call me today. They are doing open walk in interviews.

    I've also applied to about 10 other new places that are all hiring in the past 3 days. I'm a little nervous going back to work for the first time in several years, but also excited. Wish me luck fellas.


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    I might also add, I'm going to be working a little over the average part-time in all likely hood about 30 to 34 hours a week according to my friends. Given average entry level position hourly wages here for most retail like Kroger and given my past retail experience, I will most likely get between 9 and 10 dollars an hour.

    This may be enough to move out on, if I am able to get a roommate. My parents are considering strongly cosigning a starter home for me at around $55,000 - $65,000. You can get pretty big starter homes for my area apparently, we found one that's around that price (58k) which is a strong and promising candidate. The mortgage is negotiable but minimum $250 a month. It's a 3 bedroom 2 bath house, full living room (though small), and fully furnished new appliance kitchen (also small). It's an older house from the 60s, in a "restoration neighborhood", where alot of College grads are living along with mostly old people. 90% of the houses (including this one) have been restored/renovated significantly and updated.

    This could be my chance to leave, especially if I can find 1 or 2 roommates to help with the mortgage/utilities/internet (which will cost me around 600ish dollars per month total according to my research). I am a little weary cosigning with my parents though. We have yet to work out the details.


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    Wish me luck.


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    Dude, you can do better.


  • Thunder Goddess
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    Fingers crossed!

    “None of us are saints.” – Albert Fish
    "You can't have everything. Where would you put it?" -- Stephen Wright


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    Fugglantis said:

    Dude, you can do better.

    Yep, I know that. I just need to get my foot back into the workforce for a few months. I'm gonna keep looking in the mean time, that's my plan.

    I think it'll be ok. As long as I am able to finish my Associate's in Computer Science, this Spring (I'm on schedule to graduate then :D) then I'll be pretty likely to get an computer programming internship/server admin/IT type position. Which is what I'd like to start out, they usually make like 30 to 40 thousand a year entry level too. :D

    Also, I have a potential roomie lined up now, just talked to him about it. :)


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    good luck on the jobby-job-job. u can doo eet!

    as for buying a house. if you're reluctant to cosign with your parents, maybe look at renting first? esp if you're gonna try to get a couple roommates, renting is the better option because the commitment is much less, and you can possibly save up for a year or two and gather a decent down payment on a new home. also, you'll go up in pay over that couple years, which means you might not need a cosigner at that point.

    something else to consider as well. if you keep roommates in a house you own, you'll be a landlord to them while also being a roommate. that tends to not work so well once they start to slip on their end of the bargain (and they almost always do).

    at any rate, you're trying to improve your life, and that's commendable. there's a lot of people (some on these boards) who should follow that lead. good on ya.


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    I don't want to rent if I can help it at all. I think it'll be ok though, I am good at keeping a job once I get it actually. I am a hard and very smart worker unlike most in the workforce these days. I only quit before because of significant psychiatric problems, which I am doing alot better on believe it or not.

    I'm trying to balance things out though, and not burn myself out again. It gives me a chance to permanently escape here though. If they cosign with me, do any of you know anything about that? Anyone got experience with it? Any tips or things I should be concerned about? The Mortgage is only about 250 dollars there about, and that's if I get it at the listed price and not reduced from negotiation. I think we can get them down about another 2 to 3 thousand.


  • IB
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    Where the f**k is a mortgage $250 a month.

    This sig is an awesome sig. :love::love::love::love::love::love::love::love: - InsaneFox
    some of us are good at suck - discolemonade


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    SandStoneReborn said:

    Anyone got experience with it? Any tips or things I should be concerned about?

    as a matter of fact...

    a $55k loan at 3.5% for 30 years will be just shy of $250/mo. since this is a starter and you won't be there forever, i don't recommend shortening the term (you could do 20 or 15 years and get a lower interest rate, but you'd be paying a bit more and it doesn't sound like your budget will allow for that so stick with 30 years). if you cosign, you could get a better rate and you'll obviously qualify for more. as long as your parents understand that they're on the hook if you drop off the deep end and stop paying, i don't think it's necessarily a bad idea. when you move up in house in, say, five years, you hopefully won't need their buying power and they'll be off the hook when the old house sells. i'm not a huge fan of cosigning, but if you absolutely have to do it to get the loan and everyone is good with it, then go for it.

    as for the house itself. don't forget, you'll have to purchase homeowner's insurance. that will probably run you $600-800 per year for that size house, assuming your insurable and don't have a horrid claim history. good cosigners may help with this, not sure. also, property taxes. these are hard to guess at because i don't know your location, but i would assume around $1,000 per year. you can "escrow" those amounts into your monthly payment (spread their payment over 12 months), which would bring your payment up from $250/mo to about $400/mo. still a lot better than paying rent.

    i'm gonna guess around $150/mo for electric and gas. another $30/mo for water/sewer/trash. $50/mo for internet. and food, you'll need that too. call it $120/mo (conservatively), or add $100/mo to that if you have particular taste. that's another $350-450/mo for living expenses.

    you're also going to be responsible for maintenance and repair, but that can be hard to budget because you won't be spending money there until something breaks down or you decide to tackle a particular project, like a new roof or windows. we'll leave that out of the equation for now.

    so your total (estimated) cost to live there will be around $800/mo altogether. with a $10/hr job @ 35hrs/wk, you'll be bringing home around $1200 each month after taxes. this is doable, even if you live by yourself. if you add 2 roommates and charge them each $200/mo plus a share of the utilities (say, $75/mo average per person), your out-of-pocket drops to probably under $400/mo. hell yeah.


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    Huntsville, Alabama. It's a restored house from the 60s but it has been redone with all wood floors, tiled kitchen and bathroom, 3 bedrooms with fans and repainted, new doors, molding, and all new appliances in kitchen and washer/dryer. Yard is like medium-small, but it's a nice lot. I'm excited, I'm going to try to get this if I can. No promises yet though, but I'm close.


  • IB
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    Good luck with the adulting!


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    wacky1980 said:

    SandStoneReborn said:

    Anyone got experience with it? Any tips or things I should be concerned about?

    as a matter of fact...

    a $55k loan at 3.5% for 30 years will be just shy of $250/mo. since this is a starter and you won't be there forever, i don't recommend shortening the term (you could do 20 or 15 years and get a lower interest rate, but you'd be paying a bit more and it doesn't sound like your budget will allow for that so stick with 30 years). if you cosign, you could get a better rate and you'll obviously qualify for more. as long as your parents understand that they're on the hook if you drop off the deep end and stop paying, i don't think it's necessarily a bad idea. when you move up in house in, say, five years, you hopefully won't need their buying power and they'll be off the hook when the old house sells. i'm not a huge fan of cosigning, but if you absolutely have to do it to get the loan and everyone is good with it, then go for it.

    as for the house itself. don't forget, you'll have to purchase homeowner's insurance. that will probably run you $600-800 per year for that size house, assuming your insurable and don't have a horrid claim history. good cosigners may help with this, not sure. also, property taxes. these are hard to guess at because i don't know your location, but i would assume around $1,000 per year. you can "escrow" those amounts into your monthly payment (spread their payment over 12 months), which would bring your payment up from $250/mo to about $400/mo. still a lot better than paying rent.

    i'm gonna guess around $150/mo for electric and gas. another $30/mo for water/sewer/trash. $50/mo for internet. and food, you'll need that too. call it $120/mo (conservatively), or add $100/mo to that if you have particular taste. that's another $350-450/mo for living expenses.

    you're also going to be responsible for maintenance and repair, but that can be hard to budget because you won't be spending money there until something breaks down or you decide to tackle a particular project, like a new roof or windows. we'll leave that out of the equation for now.

    so your total (estimated) cost to live there will be around $800/mo altogether. with a $10/hr job @ 35hrs/wk, you'll be bringing home around $1200 each month after taxes. this is doable, even if you live by yourself. if you add 2 roommates and charge them each $200/mo plus a share of the utilities (say, $75/mo average per person), your out-of-pocket drops to probably under $400/mo. hell yeah.

    Thanks so much man, this is more detailed than my estimates but I thought it would be around there some where based on my calculations. Do you think I could actually get the mortgage loan by myself? Is there anything I would need to do in order to get the loan? I do have good credit, and it's only increased since I turned 18. Though I've had about 5k in credit card debt at one point, that is all payed off. Only thing I owe on is the car my dad sold me, and I only owe about 2k on that. If I'm making the 10 dollars an hour minimum that I will likely get do you think I could do this? I already have 1 roomie lined up that if everything works out will be able to move in with me 80 to 90% chance.


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    Vamped said:

    Good luck with the adulting!

    I'm hopeful for the first time in like 6 years. I feel so happy atm, but I'm trying to temper my expectations for the moment. I need to stay in school if nothing else, taking 3 to 4 classes a semester and at least 1 in the summer to get my Associates in the Spring, I'm already accepted to University Alabama Huntsville, for next year to work on my Bachelor's in Computer Science in Entertainment Computing (it's the same as a normal CS degree with a few extras specifically geared towards simulations, graphics, video games, and VR stuff).


  • Helper
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    Good luck with the interview. Cite your work history as much as possible with your schooling and go in asking for $11/hr and inquire about the management program. Worst case scenario they say no and you stock shelves for $10/hr. Best case is they say yes and you move over to the corporate career track.

    Wacky broke down the numbers for ya, as far as the house itself, get a home inspection for sure. Get it from someone who is independent or from your agent. Things to look out for, how old is the electrical, you said the build was 60's, so you don't have to worry about knob and tube (this is good) but you might have a mix of aluminum and copper, which can be problematic if it wasn't done right. Be sure to have the main drain stack scoped to make sure the tiles haven't broken, got tree roots or gotten out of alignment. That can be really expensive to repair. Take a good look at the furnace/AC as well, new systems can be upwards of fifteen thousand dollars.

    Otherwise good luck with this, glad to hear you are getting it together and moving in a positive direction.

    The probability that we may fail in the struggle aught not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just. -Abraham Lincoln


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    you probably won't be able to use the roommate as leverage in securing the loan. as long as your debt-to-income ratio is low, and with decent / good credit, i don't think the bank will have a problem giving you the loan. if you're bringing home $1,200/mo, and your total monthly payments to debt (with the potential mortgage included) wasn't projected to be more than probably $500/mo, you'd probably qualify by yourself. without a down payment though, you might have to apply to a usda- or fha-style "first time homebuyer" program to get up to 100% financing on the purchase. the loan rate might not be quite as good as what you can get outside the program, but a half a point won't make too much difference in the monthly payment, maybe $20/mo.

    it might be close, but it's possible you could qualify on paper, with just your income. you might need a personal loan from pops for a down payment, which would bring down the loan amount and the monthly payment considerably. assume you could get a 20% down payment in place on a $55k purchase price, that would be $11,000 as a down payment and the loan would then be only $44k. that would come out to around $200/mo loan payments instead of $250. but then you owe your parents $11k, and that might not be an attractive option either.


  • IB
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    Holy shit you guys are such good adults


  • Banned
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    Whats Krogers?

    If you gotta go go with a smile


  • 2

    Vamped said:

    Holy shit you guys are such good adults

    it would appear that way, right? and appearance is everything.


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    Jingai said:

    Good luck with the interview. Cite your work history as much as possible with your schooling and go in asking for $11/hr and inquire about the management program. Worst case scenario they say no and you stock shelves for $10/hr. Best case is they say yes and you move over to the corporate career track.

    Wacky broke down the numbers for ya, as far as the house itself, get a home inspection for sure. Get it from someone who is independent or from your agent. Things to look out for, how old is the electrical, you said the build was 60's, so you don't have to worry about knob and tube (this is good) but you might have a mix of aluminum and copper, which can be problematic if it wasn't done right. Be sure to have the main drain stack scoped to make sure the tiles haven't broken, got tree roots or gotten out of alignment. That can be really expensive to repair. Take a good look at the furnace/AC as well, new systems can be upwards of fifteen thousand dollars.

    Otherwise good luck with this, glad to hear you are getting it together and moving in a positive direction.

    AC and wiring has all been replaced, and new roof as well. I will have it inspected beforehand though, I know better than that.


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    Southern and Western grocery store/retail chain. They own other subsidiaries too, word has it in a few years they will be a national chain for first time though.


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